If We Deny Him, He Also Will Deny Us

These words are found in 2 Timothy 2:12, right after “if we suffer with Him, we will reign with Him.”

Suffering is no fun.

In the Parable of the Sower, Jesus describes seed that falls on stony ground. A little green shoot pops up, but when the sun rises to its peak, the little shoot gets scorched, withers, and dies.

This seed represents people who believe for a short time until it gets hard, a little suffering comes their way, and they quit.

Suffering has a way of weeding out the pretenders. A little persecution will show who truly believes and who is playing a game.

When you are healthy and wealthy, faith is pretty easy. But when things get tough and life falls apart, what will you do then?

For the believer, suffering increases faith and leads to spiritual growth. For the unbeliever, suffering drives them further from God, they may even blame God and resent Him.

Peter said many confident things in company with like-minded people, but when Jesus was arrested and things turned bad, Peter denied Christ.

Jesus says in Matthew 10:33, “But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven.

Jesus Christ was/is consistent on this issue. Paul reiterates what Christ said by saying it again in 2 Timothy.

So, what happened with Peter? Has Christ denied him?

Well, Peter repented and came back. The rest of Peter’s life shows that he did not completely disown Christ. He came back. God is always willing to forgive.

But if you deny Christ and never come back, Christ will deny you too. Stern words, but I see no aspect of Christ’s character that makes Him say things that aren’t true.

Jesus Christ always does what He says, which is Paul’s final point in this section of 2 Timothy 2.

4 thoughts on “If We Deny Him, He Also Will Deny Us”

  1. If we disown him,
    he will also disown us;
    if we are faithless,
    he remains faithful,
    for he cannot disown himself

    Somehow the proponents of “Once Saved Always Saved” like to use this section of scripture to support their view.
    They seem to blank out the bit about disowning and highlight the part about God’s faithfulness.

    They must read this as if it means faithlessness on our part towards Him doesn’t matter because He will remain faithful towards us.

    But that interpretation is undermined by the preceding statements about disowning.

    I believe the quote is about God’s faithfulness to HIMSELF (clue is in “he cannot disown himself”).

    So no matter how much He may like to see everyone saved, He cannot grant salvation if doing so compromises the righteousness aspect His character.

    People always prefer to recognise God as love – but aren’t as keen to balance that with His righteousness.
    The tension between those two parts of His character is the reason why God’s love for the world was expressed in the giving of His Son and NOT in the giving of salvation without the sacrifice of His Son.

    God’s righteousness made it necessary for His love to be costly to HIM.

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