Christmas and God Becoming Flesh

Christmas is a couple days away. Christmas is allegedly the day when we pause to remember the coming of Jesus Christ.

I have no idea what people think this means. On our calendar I imagine it looks a lot like Martin Luther King Jr. Day or Presidents Day–Just another day to remember some guys who did some stuff we like to remember.

Some refer to Christmas as “Jesus’ Birthday.” I get it, that’s fine, but I also think it’s a tad misleading. Jesus Christ was around at the beginning, His birth is different from our births.

I have no idea where I was before birth. The Bible does not answer this question so any answer is merely speculation. The Bible does tell us where Jesus was before His birth–He was with the Father.

The birth of Jesus Christ did not mark the beginning of Christ. The birth of Christ was merely the humanizing of the eternal God. God became flesh.

God becoming flesh is truly a stunning idea! The Creator becomes part of created reality. That’s stunning.

God became flesh.

He didn’t passively sit in heaven and watch us suffer. He didn’t ignore His creation. He is not unfeeling toward the disaster that has come upon His creation through sin.

Instead, God took part in our suffering. He was born as a baby, and regardless of some odd Christmas Carols, I imagine He did make some crying. He was hungry, thirsty, in pain and even wept at the funeral of a friend and over the lostness of sinners who refused to come to Him.

God became flesh and was tainted with all the problems of flesh life, minus sin.

To deny this fact, that God became flesh, is to disqualify you from claiming to be a Christian. It’s a central tenet of Christian thought and biblical revelation.

If Christ is not in the flesh, then God did not dwell among us, nor did He suffer and die for us, nor could there be any real sense in which He rose again.

If Christ is not God in the flesh, then the Gospel is not the Gospel and we are yet in our sins.

“Beloved, believe not every spirit, but try the spirits whether they are of God: because many false prophets are gone out into the world. Hereby know ye the Spirit of God: Every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is of God: And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God: and this is that spirit of antichrist, whereof ye have heard that it should come; and even now already is it in the world.”

2 thoughts on “Christmas and God Becoming Flesh”

  1. “I have no idea where I was before birth. The Bible does I have no idea where I was before birth. The Bible does not answer this question so any answer is merely speculation. The Bible does tell us where Jesus was before His birth–He was with the Father.”

    It may seem like there is no specific verse but there are and you can reasonably understand what the bible teaches about life and death as it pertains to mankind.

  2. > Every spirit that confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is of God:
    >And every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh
    >is not of God: and this is that spirit of antichrist

    We should not be so naive as to suppose that this test for antichrist is merely about an historical fact of Christ’s dual nature. Christ’s coming in the flesh is repeated in every believer.

    2 Cor. 13:5 – Know ye not your own selves, how that Jesus Christ is in you, except ye be reprobates?

    Antichrist (or Satan who is the real antagonist) wants to prevent this.

    In order to prevent it, he can invent doctrines that make Christ to be so divine (thus degrading his connection with fallen humanity), so that Christ becomes a superman, whose life is interesting but has no connection with our lives in our flesh. Of such sort of teachings are the Catholic doctrine of the Immaculate Conception, although many Protestants today believe not much differently: namely that Christ had a different kind of flesh than ours, and therefore we cannot overcome sin.

    Or, Satan can invent doctrines that make Christ altogether so human, that there is no need for us to have a spiritual regeneration…just merely “try” to be like Him.

    Both of these effectively cut off man from God, and so are of Antichrist. They destroy real faith: faith that grasps the power of God in Christ, and brings down His life into ours. This is the real Christmas, that Christ can be born in us today, and His life can be seen again in fallen, mortal flesh and blood.

    Very few of the Christmas songs actually celebrate this, except perhaps “O Little Town of Bethlehem,” which has some really meaningful and beautiful lines of poetry in it.

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