Whore of Babylon, Catholics and Protestants

Revelation 17 reveals the whore of Babylon riding on a beast with ten horns. The beast represents the one world government under a confederacy of ten kings. The whore represents the apostate church.

Revelation scholars have often seen the one world government as the Roman Empire and the whore representing the Roman Catholic Church.

Martin Luther strongly believed that the Catholic Church was the whore of Babylon to the extent he wrote a whole book about it.

Luther makes some valid points, the Catholic Church was indeed getting rich off people, providing certain spiritual services (forgiveness of sins, time off from purgatory, etc) for money like a whore.

Unfortunately, many protestants have come away thinking that the Whore of Babylon has everything to do with Catholicism and nothing to do with Protestantism.

Thus, we are not bothered by having huge churches with lots of money and highly paid church professionals. We assume only Catholics will be used by antichrist, certainly not our church.

I think we do ourselves a disservice to assume that all warnings of the Bible apply to “other people.” No matter how many theological frameworks you can devise to prove you are perfect to the extent you no longer need to “take heed lest ye fall,” you still need to take heed lest ye fall.

The Church, regardless of denomination, is a tool of Antichrist. Bank on it. Revelation starts with three chapters of warnings to churches. Funny how we’ve relegated them to past churches and not us as well isn’t it? Yup.

One comment

  1. Frank Zimmerman

    I get really suspicious when people teach that a certain set of warnings against sin don’t apply to us.

    In my understanding the messages to the 7 churches covers the whole Christian era, from the early church to the final period of the church on earth. Seven signifies completeness with respect to time. This was first established in Genesis, where the sabbath (7th day) marks the end of a week. Seven days make a full week. Seven churches makes a full church history.

    I was reading in Genesis 6 recently, about the mixture between the sons of God and daughters of men, which resulted in children of “great renown,” followed shortly after by the earth being full of evil and being destroyed by a flood.

    This mixture was also a combining of the principles of God with the principles of the world, which is what Babylon is all about. Read Revelation 18, for example, to see the connection between Babylon and the “merchants of the earth.” Instead of self-denial and separation from the world, self-promotion “for God’s glory” is the new way. “Yes, I’m making millions, but it’s all for the glory of God!”

    I’m reminded also of Nebuchadnezzar, king of the ancient Babylon. He said, “look at great Babylon that I have built.” And yet Babylon was a very religious nation, and would certainly have given honor to their gods as the reason for their victory over all nations. “All for the glory of god.”…or was it?

    It’s very interesting to read the story of Nebuchadnezzar and just see how he reacted to certain situations: he bows down to Daniel and worships him when Daniel makes known the dream, but refuses to heed the part of the dream about his kingdom passing away. He then makes an image all of gold and commands everyone to worship it. When Daniel’s friends don’t, they are thrown into the furnace, and delivered. Nebuchadnezzar then commands all to worship their God, or be persecuted to death! Finally, lost in self-exaltation, he loses his reason, and after many years of humiliation, gets a personal experience of the true God, and honors Him the right way. But that’s the end of his fame, and you don’t hear of him after that!

    Today we have “christian” football players, rock stars, teen idols, faith healers, presidents, etc. It’s quite popular, and all “for the glory of God.” We have our “men of great renown.”

    Jer. 45:5 – “Seekest thou great things for thyself? Seek them not.”